Poster presenters sought for Neuro X symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual symposium on May 1, 2015 in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus. The theme for the speakers this year is Neuro X, where X stands for medicine, nanotechnology, engineering, science and more! Posters on any multidisciplinary theme are now being accepted. You do not have to be a member of an INBT affiliated laboratory to participate. Undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows welcome. The event is free for Johns Hopkins associated persons. There is a fee for those outside of JHU/JHMI/JHH and is listed on the registration form.

Full details on poster guidelines and current information on the symposium can be found on the Neuro X website. To submit a poster or to simply register to attend the symposium, click here.

neuro-x-ad-flatThe symposium will begin at 8 a.m. with continental breakfast. Talks will begin at 9 a.m. and continue through 12:15 p.m. Speakers include: Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD, FAANS, Professor of Neurological Surgery and Oncology Neuroscience and Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Jordan J. Green, PhD, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery, and Materials Science & Engineering; Ahmet Hoke MD, PhD, FRCPC, Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience; Patricia H. Janak, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences/Department of Neuroscience in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science; and Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD, the William R. Brody Professor of Radiology and Radiological Science. This year’s symposium chairs are INBT director Peter Searson, Reynolds Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, and Dwight Bergles, Professor, the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery.

The poster session will begin at 1:15 p.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with poster prize presentations. Speaker talk titles, poster prizes and other details will be announced in the next few weeks. Don’t miss your chance to participate in one of Johns Hopkins largest, most popular and most well attended symposiums. Plan now to attend and present.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

 

 

INBT director wins “Provocative Questions” grant

Peter Searson (Photo by Marty Katz)

Peter Searson,  director of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, has received a “Provocative Questions” grant from the National Cancer Institute. Among the researchers nationwide who received this award, Searson is one of two at Johns Hopkins University.  Searson is the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor in the Whiting School of Engineering. He is a professor of materials science and engineering and also co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence.

A press release issued by Johns Hopkins states:

Two Johns Hopkins scientists are among the first recipients of grants geared to answer “Provocative Questions” in cancer research, a new project funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Cynthia Sears, M.D., and Peter Searson, Ph.D., will receive more than $500,000 combined in the first of five years of funding.

The federally funded “Provocative Questions” project will distribute more than $22 million this year among 57 grant recipients nationwide. Each grant aims to provide answers to one of 24 questions, solicited from the research community, that address neglected or unsolved areas of cancer research.

Sears and Searson’s projects were chosen by a specially-designed peer-review process from among more than 700 applications submitted by scientists.

Sears will receive $236,480 in the first year of funding to examine how and why certain cancers may be caused by infections. An infectious disease expert, Sears has previously linked some colon cancers to common diarrheal bacteria, and her research will further explore how these and other microbes may cause colon cancer. Sears, a professor of medicine and oncology at Johns Hopkins, says these discoveries may help physicians detect earlier those at risk for colon cancer and prevent it more effectively.

With $316,513 in first-year funding, Searson will develop a new method to study how cancer spreads, also known as “metastasis.” He proposes a device with an artificial blood vessel and other cellular components to study the spread of cancer. The “lab-on-a-chip” approach could replicate processes that occur in metastasis and provide a testing ground for experiments with a method easily reproduced by scientists. Searson is the Joseph R. and Lynn C. Reynolds Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and directs the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Sears’ grant is titled “Microbial Induction of Colon Cancer and Mechanisms” (NIH, NCI grant #R21CA170492-01), and Searson’s is “An engineered platform for the study of metastasis” (NIH, NCI grant #1R01CA170629-01)

Original press release appears here.