Undergraduate symposium showcases multidisciplinary research

Undergraduate students affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) laboratories hosted their annual research symposium on Nov 10 at the Homewood campus. Five students gave oral presentations and 30 students presented posters during the half-day event designed to showcase multidisciplinary work from across INBT affiliated laboratories.

Winners Allie Zito, Joey Li and Hayley Strasburger

Symposium winners Allie Zito, Joey Li and Hayley Strasburger.

Talks were given during the first part of the symposium. Oral presenters included Damian Cross and Aseem Jain, who shared a talk about Perileve: A novel method for refractory ascites; James Shamul, who spoke about a Novel Micellar Drug Delivery System using Poly (Beta-amino ester)-Poly (ethylene glycol) copolymer; Michael Pozin, who presented Heat Transfer Modeling for Femoroplasty Procedure; and Hayley Strasburger, who described how Noggin inhibits bmp signaling in oligodendrocytes progenitor cells to repress trans-differentiation into astrocytes.

During the second half of the symposium, poster presenters talked to volunteer judges comprised of INBT staff and alumni. There were three poster categories: concept, overall and crowd favorite. While the volunteer judges evaluated the first two groups, crowd favorite was voted on by every attendee by texting a poster number to a certain phone number. Winners included in the Concept category Victor Tang (1st) and Allie Zito (2nd). In the overall category, Hayley Strasburger (1st) and Joey Li (2nd) were the inners. Allie Zito also won crowd favorite.

15000596_10154704353192277_9071690777271476868_oThe event was funded by the Office of the Provost and given organizational support by INBT. Thanks and acknowledgement to everyone who came out to the symposium, to the judges who took time away from their work to provide feedback, the Office of the Provost for funding the event and to INBT, especially Camille Mathis, Ellie Boettinger-Heasley, Tom Fekete, and Gregg Nass.

 

 

 

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Johns Hopkins and UVa co-host 2-day imaging workshop

Learn about state-of-the-art imaging methods at the In Vivo Preclinical Imaging: an Introductory Workshop, March 20-21 at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Medicine Turner Auditorium. Co-hosted by Johns Hopkins University, the University of Virginia and the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), this workshop will bring together gifted lecturers to cover the fundamentals of in vivo small animal imaging.

The workshop will cover an incredible breadth of material of interest and value to physicians, scientists (including postdoctoral fellows and graduate students) and scientific laboratory professionals interested in using molecular imaging for in vivo biomedical applications. Individuals with experience in small animal imaging as well as beginners are welcome. Participants learn the fundamentals of various small animal imaging modalities. A limited number of participants will also have the opportunity to register to attend a half-day, hands on workshop held on the afternoon of the second day, March 21. Registration for this unique opportunity is on first-come first-served, so don’t wait to register.

Speakers will address imaging modalities including MRI and MRS, PET, SPECT, optical imaging (bioluminescence & fluorescence imaging/tomography), ultrasound, x-ray CT, photoacoustic imaging and multimodality imaging. Speakers will also examine instrumentation, acquisition and reconstruction, MR/SPECT/PET imaging probes, targets and applications, small animal handling, techniques for imaging infectious disease models and data analysis.

More information about the workshop, including a full agenda of topics, registration and details about transportation and lodging can be found at the workshop website. www.snm.org/pci2012.