Undergraduate symposium showcases multidisciplinary research

Undergraduate students affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) laboratories hosted their annual research symposium on Nov 10 at the Homewood campus. Five students gave oral presentations and 30 students presented posters during the half-day event designed to showcase multidisciplinary work from across INBT affiliated laboratories.

Winners Allie Zito, Joey Li and Hayley Strasburger

Symposium winners Allie Zito, Joey Li and Hayley Strasburger.

Talks were given during the first part of the symposium. Oral presenters included Damian Cross and Aseem Jain, who shared a talk about Perileve: A novel method for refractory ascites; James Shamul, who spoke about a Novel Micellar Drug Delivery System using Poly (Beta-amino ester)-Poly (ethylene glycol) copolymer; Michael Pozin, who presented Heat Transfer Modeling for Femoroplasty Procedure; and Hayley Strasburger, who described how Noggin inhibits bmp signaling in oligodendrocytes progenitor cells to repress trans-differentiation into astrocytes.

During the second half of the symposium, poster presenters talked to volunteer judges comprised of INBT staff and alumni. There were three poster categories: concept, overall and crowd favorite. While the volunteer judges evaluated the first two groups, crowd favorite was voted on by every attendee by texting a poster number to a certain phone number. Winners included in the Concept category Victor Tang (1st) and Allie Zito (2nd). In the overall category, Hayley Strasburger (1st) and Joey Li (2nd) were the inners. Allie Zito also won crowd favorite.

15000596_10154704353192277_9071690777271476868_oThe event was funded by the Office of the Provost and given organizational support by INBT. Thanks and acknowledgement to everyone who came out to the symposium, to the judges who took time away from their work to provide feedback, the Office of the Provost for funding the event and to INBT, especially Camille Mathis, Ellie Boettinger-Heasley, Tom Fekete, and Gregg Nass.

 

 

 

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NCI grant establishes center to advance cancer curing goals

The National Cancer Institute has awarded Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) a $9 million grant to support a multidisciplinary center to discover news ways to diagnose and treat cancer. NCI, which is part of the National Institutes for Health, allocated the funds over five years to enable scholars in the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology center to apply the tools of the physical scientist, engineer, applied mathematician, cancer biologist and others to unravel how cancer cells survive, grow and migrate.

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Artist’s image of a cancer cell traveling through a 3D matrix that closely resembles the environment through which cancer cells move in a human body. IMAGE CREDIT: JENNIFER E. FAIRMAN / DEPARTMENT OF ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE

The PS-OC is comprised of researchers from university’s Whiting School of Engineering and its School of Medicine, as well as collaborators from Washington University in Saint Louis, the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center, and the University of Arizona comprise the new center based within INBT.

Denis Wirtz—the university’s vice provost for research, INBT’s associate director, professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and a member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center—will serve as director and principal investigator of the new center.

“Instead of looking at other aspects like tumor growth, I’ll be working with my colleagues in the schools of engineering and medicine to uncover the physical underpinnings of cancer metastasis,” Wirtz said. “The ‘team science’ approach in our center should result in the creation of new therapies targeting metastasis, the primary cause of human cancer deaths.”

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Denis Wirtz

Kenneth Pienta, professor of urology, oncology, and pharmacology and molecular sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, will serve as the PS-OC’s associate director. Pienta also co-directs Johns Hopkins University inHealth Signature Initiative, a trans-University, and cross-disciplinary effort to coordinate and apply the intelligent use of population health data for individual patients. Currently, his research involves defining tumor microenvironments and how they contribute to the growth of tumors and the spread of cancer. His bench laboratory program is closely tied to the development of novel therapies for prostate cancer.

Ed Schlesinger, dean of the university’s Whiting School of Engineering, endorses Wirtz’s strategy. “By approaching the problem of metastasis from an engineering perspective,” Schlesinger said, “Denis has provided an entirely new understanding of cell motility and has opened the doors to the possibility of new and far more effective cancer treatments.”

This is not the first PS-OC for INBT. Wirtz directed INBT’s first 5-year PS-OC grant, which ran from the fall of 2009 until 2014. This new PS-OC grant creates a brand new center, with projects that have evolved out of the first center’s original research goals. The new center projects include:

  • The Role of Physical Cues in Collective Cell Invasion – This project will examine how the physical forces exerted upon cancer cells when they are confined within a tumor can affect the migration of these cells, both collectively and individually. The team is led by Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, chair of the university’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
  • Forces Involved in Collective Cell Migration – When they break away from a tumor, some cancer cells seem to prefer to travel in groups. This team, led by center director Wirtz, will study the forces involved in organizing the collective migration of breast cancer cells in both 2D and 3D environments.
  • Impact of low oxygen on the migration of sarcoma cells – Low oxygen within a tumor (hypoxia) dramatically increases pulmonary metastasis and results in poor health outcomes. Researchers led by Sharon Gerecht, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, will try to determine how primary tumor cells respond to oxygen in their microenvironment. The goal is to better understand the spread of cancer and identify new treatment targets.
Dr. Ken Pienta lab coat

Ken Pienta

Other members of the Johns Hopkins PS-OC center include Andy Ewald and Daniele Gilkes of the School of Medicine, Pei-Hsun Wu and Sean X. Sun of the Whiting School of Engineering, Karin Eisinger and Celeste Simon of the University of Pennsylvania, and Charles Wolgemuth of the University of Arizona.

The Hopkins center is part of a nation-wide NCI Physical Sciences-Oncology Network.

“As a complement to traditional cancer research approaches, the innovative trans-disciplinary approaches and perspectives in the PS-ON will aid in unraveling the complexity of cancer,” said Nastaran Kuhn, associate director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology PS-ON program. “These approaches are aimed at understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of cancer progression and ultimately developing effective cancer therapies.”

 

 

Northeast Physical Sciences in Oncology Symposium

The 1st Northeast Physical Sciences in Oncology Symposium at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute will be held as part of the NCI’s Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON) initiative in collaboration with Columbia University, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The PS-ON was started by the NCI as a way to integrate the physical sciences into cancer research by encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to cancer research including disciplines such as mathematics, computational biology, physics and others. More information can be found at: physics.cancer.gov. In the spirit of this initiative, we are organizing an annual symposium series where different aspects of cancer research will be examined from multiple perspectives with a focus on different cancer-related research areas.  Ticket are free but registration is required at this link.

This Symposium will center on three different topics and sessions:

  1. Cancer Genomics and Evolution – chaired by Dr. Rabadan
  2. Cell migration and Invasion – chaired by Drs. Fredberg and Kamm
  3. Computational Methods and Algorithms – chaired by Dr. Michor

Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute’s Physical Sciences Oncology Network.

Confirmed Speakers:

Jeffrey Fredberg, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Peter Friedl, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Eric Holland, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Roger Kamm, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Doug Lauffenburger, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tanmay Lele, University of Florida

Herbert Levine, Rice University

Franziska Michor, Dana-Farber Cancer Insitute

Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Vito Quaranta, Vanderbilt University Medical School

Raul Rabadan, Columbia University, New York

David Scadden, Massachusetts General Hospital

Catherine Wu, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Poster Session:

We invite students and postdocs to present their work on novel methods and approaches relevant to the session topics. A broad range of contributions from cancer genomics, cell migration, mathematical modeling, or other relevant biomedical fields will be evaluated. Students and postdocs working on session relevant topics are particularly encouraged to participate. Please submit posters to smaisel@jimmy.harvard.edu for consideration.

 

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2017 INBT/PSOC symposium scheduled

Save the date for the 2017 Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology and Physical Sciences-Oncology Center symposium. The event will take place May 5, 2017 in the Owens Auditorium and pre-function room at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The symposium features talks in the morning and a multi-division poster session in the afternoon. Topics, invited speakers, talk titles and more detail to be announced at a later date.

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INBT Symposium in Owens Auditorium Corridor

Symposium speakers 2015: Piotr Walczak

Neuro X is the title and theme for the May 1 symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. The event kicks off with a continental breakfast at 8 a.m. in the Owens Auditorium, between CRB I and CRB II on the Johns Hopkins University medical campus. Talks begin at 9 a.m. Posters featuring multidisciplinary research from across many Hopkins divisions and departments will be on display from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

One of this year’s speakers is Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD.

Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD

Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD

Piotr Walczak is an assistant professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging. He specializes in magnetic resonance research and neuroradiology with an emphasis on stem and progenitor cell transplantation. Dr. Walczak received his MD in 2002 from the Medical University of Warsaw in Poland. He then completed a research fellowship in cell-based therapy for neurodegenerative disorders at the University of South Florida. After a fellowship in cellular imaging at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Walczak joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2008. He is an affiliated faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s F.M. Kirby Research Center and the Institute for Cell Engineering.

Dr. Walczak’s research focuses primarily on noninvasively monitoring the status of stem and progenitor cells transplanted into the disease-damaged central nervous system. Stem cells are labeled with MR contrast agents, such as iron oxide nanoparticles, to precisely determine the position of the cells after transplantation. By modifying the cells using bioluminescence and MR reporter genes, as well as the use of specific promoter sequences, Dr. Walczak is working to extract information about cell survival and differentiation.

Additional speakers will be profiled in the next few weeks. To register your poster and for more details visit http://inbt.jhu.edu/news/symposium/

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Prizes offered for top poster presenters

We need your posters! INBT’s annual symposium theme relates to neuroscience, but posters on any multidisciplinary topic are encouraged. Submission deadline for posters is April 27. Posters will be judged and prizes will be awarded to top presenters!

Erlenmeyer_Flasks.-awardJohns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosts its annual symposium May 1 in the Owens Auditorium (between CRB I and CRB II) at the medical campus. Faculty expert speakers present in the morning on our theme, Neuro X, where x can be medicine, engineering, science, etc. The poster session begins in the afternoon. Posters on ANY MULTIDISCIPLINARY TOPIC are encouraged, and we welcome submissions from any department or division. Prizes will be awarded to top presenters. Submission guidelines, the full speaker agenda and additional information can be found online. Submit your poster now at http://inbt.jhu.edu/news/symposium/

Poster presenters sought for Neuro X symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual symposium on May 1, 2015 in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus. The theme for the speakers this year is Neuro X, where X stands for medicine, nanotechnology, engineering, science and more! Posters on any multidisciplinary theme are now being accepted. You do not have to be a member of an INBT affiliated laboratory to participate. Undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows welcome. The event is free for Johns Hopkins associated persons. There is a fee for those outside of JHU/JHMI/JHH and is listed on the registration form.

Full details on poster guidelines and current information on the symposium can be found on the Neuro X website. To submit a poster or to simply register to attend the symposium, click here.

neuro-x-ad-flatThe symposium will begin at 8 a.m. with continental breakfast. Talks will begin at 9 a.m. and continue through 12:15 p.m. Speakers include: Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD, FAANS, Professor of Neurological Surgery and Oncology Neuroscience and Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Jordan J. Green, PhD, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery, and Materials Science & Engineering; Ahmet Hoke MD, PhD, FRCPC, Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience; Patricia H. Janak, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences/Department of Neuroscience in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science; and Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD, the William R. Brody Professor of Radiology and Radiological Science. This year’s symposium chairs are INBT director Peter Searson, Reynolds Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, and Dwight Bergles, Professor, the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery.

The poster session will begin at 1:15 p.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with poster prize presentations. Speaker talk titles, poster prizes and other details will be announced in the next few weeks. Don’t miss your chance to participate in one of Johns Hopkins largest, most popular and most well attended symposiums. Plan now to attend and present.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

 

 

Drug-chemo combo destroys challenging breast cancer stem cells

Gregg Semenza

Gregg Semenza

Researchers affiliated with Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) have shown that combining chemotherapy with an agent that blocks a certain cancer survival protein holds the key to fighting one of the the toughest forms of breast cancer.

Only 20 percent of patients with what are known as “triple-negative” breast cancer cells respond to chemotherapy. PS-OC associate director and Johns Hopkins professor of  medicine Gregg Semenza demonstrated in a recent study that chemotherapy actually enhances triple-negative cancer stem cell survival by switching on proteins called hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). But when combined with currently available and FDA-approved HIF-inhibiting drugs, such as digoxin, Semenza said, chemotherapy shrank tumors.

Mice with implanted triple-negative breast cancer stem cells were treated with a combination therapy comprised of the HIF-inhibiting drug plus the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. That combo treatment decreased tumor size by 30 percent more than treatment with chemotherapy. Furthermore, Semenza’s study showed that combining digoxin with the a different chemotherapeutic agent called gemcitabine “brought tumor volumes to zero within three weeks and prevented the immediate relapse at the end of treatment that was seen in mice treated with gemcitabine alone,” a press release on the study stated. Clinical trials will be needed to verify these results.

Debangshu Samanta, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Semenza lab, was the lead author on this research published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Additional authors include Daniele Gilkes, Pallavi Chaturvedi and Lisha Xiang of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Read the PNAS article here.

Visit the PS-OC website here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

Gerecht nets American Heart Association grant

Sharon Gerecht, associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, has received the prestigious American Heart Association Established Investigator Award.

sharongerecht_cropThe AHA awarded only four such grants this year, funding designed to support mid-career of investigators who show unusual promise and accomplishments in the study of “cardiovascular or cerebrovascular science.”

Gerecht’s research focuses on engineering platforms, specifically hydrogels, that are designed to coax stem cells to develop into the building blocks of blood vessels. The hope is that these approaches could be used to help repair circulatory systems that have been damaged by heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses.

Additionally, Gerecht leads a research project in the Johns Hopkins Physical Science-Oncology Center where she is studying the effects of low oxygen (hypoxia) on the tumor growth and blood vessel formation. The AHA funding will support her work on regulating hypoxia in hydrogels for vascular regeneration. The award is worth approximately $400,000 over five years.

Learn more about the Gerecht lab here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

INBT’s fall student symposium Nov. 7

An important opportunity in graduate school is to get peer and mentor feedback on results. One of the best ways to do that is to share what you have been working on with your colleagues at a symposium.

Jordan Green

Jordan Green

Come hear the latest updates from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s research centers on Friday, November 7 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Great Hall at Levering on the Homewood campus! Students affiliated with laboratories from the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and INBT will present at this student-organized symposium. This event is free and open to the Johns Hopkins community. Refreshments provided.

The keynote faculty speaker is Jordan Green, associate professor at Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering. Green was recently named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10.” Breakfast, networking and introductions begin at 9 a.m.

Student speakers and topics include:
**Kristen Kozielski – Bioreducible nanoparticles for efficient and environmentally triggered siRNA delivery to primary human glioblastoma cells. Jordan Green Lab. 9:30-9:45 a.m.

**Angela Jimenez – Spatio-temporal characterization of tumor growth and invasion in three-dimensions (3D). Denis Wirtz Lab. 9:50-10:05 a.m.

**Amanda Levy – Development of an in vitro system for the study of neuroinflammation. Peter Searson Lab. 10:10- 10:25 a.m.

**Max Bogorad – An engineered microvessel platform for quantitative imaging of drug permeability and absorption.  Peter Searson Lab. 10:30-10:45 a.m.

**Greg Wiedman – Peptide Mediated Methods of Nanoparticle Drug Delivery. Kalina Hristova Lab. 10:50 to 11:05 a.m.

**Jordan Green – Particle-based micro and nanotechnology to treat cancer 11:10 a.m. – 12:10 p.m.

Please RSVP on our Facebook event page here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.