Symposium speakers 2015: Piotr Walczak

Neuro X is the title and theme for the May 1 symposium hosted by Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. The event kicks off with a continental breakfast at 8 a.m. in the Owens Auditorium, between CRB I and CRB II on the Johns Hopkins University medical campus. Talks begin at 9 a.m. Posters featuring multidisciplinary research from across many Hopkins divisions and departments will be on display from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

One of this year’s speakers is Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD.

Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD

Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD

Piotr Walczak is an assistant professor in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging. He specializes in magnetic resonance research and neuroradiology with an emphasis on stem and progenitor cell transplantation. Dr. Walczak received his MD in 2002 from the Medical University of Warsaw in Poland. He then completed a research fellowship in cell-based therapy for neurodegenerative disorders at the University of South Florida. After a fellowship in cellular imaging at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Walczak joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins in 2008. He is an affiliated faculty member at the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s F.M. Kirby Research Center and the Institute for Cell Engineering.

Dr. Walczak’s research focuses primarily on noninvasively monitoring the status of stem and progenitor cells transplanted into the disease-damaged central nervous system. Stem cells are labeled with MR contrast agents, such as iron oxide nanoparticles, to precisely determine the position of the cells after transplantation. By modifying the cells using bioluminescence and MR reporter genes, as well as the use of specific promoter sequences, Dr. Walczak is working to extract information about cell survival and differentiation.

Additional speakers will be profiled in the next few weeks. To register your poster and for more details visit http://inbt.jhu.edu/news/symposium/

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Prizes offered for top poster presenters

We need your posters! INBT’s annual symposium theme relates to neuroscience, but posters on any multidisciplinary topic are encouraged. Submission deadline for posters is April 27. Posters will be judged and prizes will be awarded to top presenters!

Erlenmeyer_Flasks.-awardJohns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosts its annual symposium May 1 in the Owens Auditorium (between CRB I and CRB II) at the medical campus. Faculty expert speakers present in the morning on our theme, Neuro X, where x can be medicine, engineering, science, etc. The poster session begins in the afternoon. Posters on ANY MULTIDISCIPLINARY TOPIC are encouraged, and we welcome submissions from any department or division. Prizes will be awarded to top presenters. Submission guidelines, the full speaker agenda and additional information can be found online. Submit your poster now at http://inbt.jhu.edu/news/symposium/

Poster presenters sought for Neuro X symposium

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) hosts its ninth annual symposium on May 1, 2015 in the Owens Auditorium on the Johns Hopkins medical campus. The theme for the speakers this year is Neuro X, where X stands for medicine, nanotechnology, engineering, science and more! Posters on any multidisciplinary theme are now being accepted. You do not have to be a member of an INBT affiliated laboratory to participate. Undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows welcome. The event is free for Johns Hopkins associated persons. There is a fee for those outside of JHU/JHMI/JHH and is listed on the registration form.

Full details on poster guidelines and current information on the symposium can be found on the Neuro X website. To submit a poster or to simply register to attend the symposium, click here.

neuro-x-ad-flatThe symposium will begin at 8 a.m. with continental breakfast. Talks will begin at 9 a.m. and continue through 12:15 p.m. Speakers include: Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, MD, FAANS, Professor of Neurological Surgery and Oncology Neuroscience and Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Jordan J. Green, PhD, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Ophthalmology, Neurosurgery, and Materials Science & Engineering; Ahmet Hoke MD, PhD, FRCPC, Professor, Neurology and Neuroscience; Patricia H. Janak, Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences/Department of Neuroscience in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; Piotr Walczak, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science; and Martin G. Pomper, MD, PhD, the William R. Brody Professor of Radiology and Radiological Science. This year’s symposium chairs are INBT director Peter Searson, Reynolds Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, and Dwight Bergles, Professor, the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery.

The poster session will begin at 1:15 p.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with poster prize presentations. Speaker talk titles, poster prizes and other details will be announced in the next few weeks. Don’t miss your chance to participate in one of Johns Hopkins largest, most popular and most well attended symposiums. Plan now to attend and present.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

 

 

Drug-chemo combo destroys challenging breast cancer stem cells

Gregg Semenza

Gregg Semenza

Researchers affiliated with Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) have shown that combining chemotherapy with an agent that blocks a certain cancer survival protein holds the key to fighting one of the the toughest forms of breast cancer.

Only 20 percent of patients with what are known as “triple-negative” breast cancer cells respond to chemotherapy. PS-OC associate director and Johns Hopkins professor of  medicine Gregg Semenza demonstrated in a recent study that chemotherapy actually enhances triple-negative cancer stem cell survival by switching on proteins called hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). But when combined with currently available and FDA-approved HIF-inhibiting drugs, such as digoxin, Semenza said, chemotherapy shrank tumors.

Mice with implanted triple-negative breast cancer stem cells were treated with a combination therapy comprised of the HIF-inhibiting drug plus the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. That combo treatment decreased tumor size by 30 percent more than treatment with chemotherapy. Furthermore, Semenza’s study showed that combining digoxin with the a different chemotherapeutic agent called gemcitabine “brought tumor volumes to zero within three weeks and prevented the immediate relapse at the end of treatment that was seen in mice treated with gemcitabine alone,” a press release on the study stated. Clinical trials will be needed to verify these results.

Debangshu Samanta, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Semenza lab, was the lead author on this research published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Additional authors include Daniele Gilkes, Pallavi Chaturvedi and Lisha Xiang of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Read the PNAS article here.

Visit the PS-OC website here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

Gerecht nets American Heart Association grant

Sharon Gerecht, associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, has received the prestigious American Heart Association Established Investigator Award.

sharongerecht_cropThe AHA awarded only four such grants this year, funding designed to support mid-career of investigators who show unusual promise and accomplishments in the study of “cardiovascular or cerebrovascular science.”

Gerecht’s research focuses on engineering platforms, specifically hydrogels, that are designed to coax stem cells to develop into the building blocks of blood vessels. The hope is that these approaches could be used to help repair circulatory systems that have been damaged by heart disease, diabetes, and other illnesses.

Additionally, Gerecht leads a research project in the Johns Hopkins Physical Science-Oncology Center where she is studying the effects of low oxygen (hypoxia) on the tumor growth and blood vessel formation. The AHA funding will support her work on regulating hypoxia in hydrogels for vascular regeneration. The award is worth approximately $400,000 over five years.

Learn more about the Gerecht lab here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact INBT’s science writer Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

 

INBT’s fall student symposium Nov. 7

An important opportunity in graduate school is to get peer and mentor feedback on results. One of the best ways to do that is to share what you have been working on with your colleagues at a symposium.

Jordan Green

Jordan Green

Come hear the latest updates from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s research centers on Friday, November 7 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Great Hall at Levering on the Homewood campus! Students affiliated with laboratories from the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and INBT will present at this student-organized symposium. This event is free and open to the Johns Hopkins community. Refreshments provided.

The keynote faculty speaker is Jordan Green, associate professor at Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering. Green was recently named one of Popular Science magazine’s “Brilliant 10.” Breakfast, networking and introductions begin at 9 a.m.

Student speakers and topics include:
**Kristen Kozielski – Bioreducible nanoparticles for efficient and environmentally triggered siRNA delivery to primary human glioblastoma cells. Jordan Green Lab. 9:30-9:45 a.m.

**Angela Jimenez – Spatio-temporal characterization of tumor growth and invasion in three-dimensions (3D). Denis Wirtz Lab. 9:50-10:05 a.m.

**Amanda Levy – Development of an in vitro system for the study of neuroinflammation. Peter Searson Lab. 10:10- 10:25 a.m.

**Max Bogorad – An engineered microvessel platform for quantitative imaging of drug permeability and absorption.  Peter Searson Lab. 10:30-10:45 a.m.

**Greg Wiedman – Peptide Mediated Methods of Nanoparticle Drug Delivery. Kalina Hristova Lab. 10:50 to 11:05 a.m.

**Jordan Green – Particle-based micro and nanotechnology to treat cancer 11:10 a.m. – 12:10 p.m.

Please RSVP on our Facebook event page here.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Boarding the research bandwagon

The story of how I joined Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) is actually one of those moments where it just hits you – Why haven’t I thought about doing this before? It started with me being back at home during the winter of my sophomore year, meeting friends of my parents and answering the most common question: Where do you study? One of the reactions that stuck with me the whole night was “Wow, how does it feel to be in the center of the most cutting-edge research?” This made me realize how I’d been oblivious to one of the things I would love to get involved in.

Better one and a half years late than never, I decided to join the research bandwagon as well. I started going through the profiles of labs on Homewood campus, looking for a topic that would make me want to be there in lab every free minute during the year. I finally found one that sparked my curiosity: the Denis Wirtz Lab. Dr. Wirtz is the Smoot Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and also the University’s Vice Provost for Research.

IMG_0161

Working in the lab!

Though at the time most of the stuff I read about the Wirtz lab went over my head, I knew that cancer was something I had always wanted the world to be rid of. Seeing near and dear ones succumb to it was one of the most excruciating things which I wanted no one to experience in the future. Fascinated by the approach taken by Dr. Wirtz, I shot him off an email and to my amazement, I got an email back within the hour, “Sent to my grad students, look forward to working with you. d”. The next day I was scheduled to be back in Baltimore, and the day after that, I was a part of Wirtz lab.

During my training, I remember asking one of my peers “How in the world can I remember all these procedures, let alone do them?” She simply smiled and said, “You’ll see”. In a few weeks, I found myself doing those very procedures, one step after another as if it were a reflex action. I would most definitely attribute me being able to do this to my grad student Hasini Jayatilaka (don’t kill me for calling you out!). At the end of the day, what I felt it boiled down to, was realizing that the person I work for was in the same shoes five-seven years ago as I was now, and she wouldn’t expect anything unrealistic out of me. Once you embrace the challenge ahead, knowing that there is no need to be intimidated, you’re good to go.

The best part of being involved in research, apart from the work you do, is sitting in class in a lecture hall and suddenly tune in to the professor talking about something that you do in lab each day. That moment cements your understanding of why you did what you’ve been doing for so many days, it connects the dots in your mind, and that moment is when you’ve completed the full circle between theory and practice.

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Our team at a poster presentation over the summer.

For me personally, having to come to lab got me into a disciplined schedule. I had a fixed time for all days of the week now to wake up (which for me used to be the latest possible time before), since if I had no morning classes, I was in lab. It helped me a lot with my time management skills, with me cutting down on TV shows and sporadic naps. To my surprise, it did not affect the amount of time I spent with my friends, as the reduction in TV shows and naps was (extremely) disturbingly enough to keep every other aspect of my daily schedule the same. Being surrounded in lab by people in similar academic disciplines also gets me a ton of advice on classes. It’s like my own little “rate-my-professor” that encourages me to definitely take some class if it is “the best class I will take at Hopkins”. At times, it’s also a ‘learning den’ where I can get help with classes if I need to. Getting involved in a research lab also came with social outings with the team, with our dinners enabling us to get to know each other on a more personal level. I feel that this in a big way contributed to the chemistry we have while working with each other, made us comfortable spending time with each other at work.

At this point, after nine exciting months, including a fully lab-packed summer, I feel that this continues to be one of the best decisions I made so far. I do not regret being here every day, but take pride in saying “I need to be in lab”. One of the most cherished take-away for me is developing a sense of accountability for my actions, which I feel is an important aspect in life. I would definitely encourage being involved in research while at Hopkins as you have nothing to lose but so much to gain.

Pranay Tyle, is a junior in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering minoring in Economics, and hopes to one day manufacture low cost medicine accessible to those in dire need across the globe.

For all press inquiries regarding INBT, its faculty and programs, contact Mary Spiro, mspiro@jhu.edu or 410-516-4802.

Veltri presents PS-OC hosted talk on digital pathology and prostate cancer

Robert Veltri, associate professor Of Urology and Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Director of the Fisher Biomarker Biorepository Laboratory, will  present the talk Quantitative Histomorphometry of Digital Pathology: Case study in prostate cancer,” to members of the Denis Wirtz Lab and the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center on Monday, December 9 at 2 p.m. in Croft G40 on the Homewood campus. Seating is limited.

veltri

Robert Veltri

Veltri studies the biomarkers for prostate and bladder cancer and is collaborating on applications of Quantitative Digital Image Analysis (QDIA) using microscopy to quantify nuclear structure and tissue architecture. Collaborations include Case Western Reserve University biomedical engineering and the University of Pittsburgh Electrical Engineering departments studying to assess cancer aggressiveness in prostate cancer (PCa). Furthermore,  he is studying the application of molecular biomarkers for prostate (CaP) and bladder cancer (BlCa) detection and prognosis. Veltri’s work is funded by the National Cancer Institute’s PS-OC program grant), Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), and the Department of Defense related to research on Active Surveillance for PCa. He is also a co-investigator on a SBIR-I and II grant studying the application of microtransponders to multiplex molecular urine and serum biomarker testing for CaP.  Veltri has authored over 152 scientific publications and is either inventor or co-inventor on over twenty patents and two trademarks.

Veltri presents PS-OC hosted talk on digital pathology and prostate cancer

Robert Veltri, associate professor Of Urology and Oncology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Director of the Fisher Biomarker Biorepository Laboratory, will  present the talk Quantitative Histomorphometry of Digital Pathology: Case study in prostate cancer,” to members of the Denis Wirtz Lab and the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center on Monday, December 9 at 2 p.m. in Croft G40 on the Homewood campus. Seating is limited.

veltri

Robert Veltri

Veltri studies the biomarkers for prostate and bladder cancer and is collaborating on applications of Quantitative Digital Image Analysis (QDIA) using microscopy to quantify nuclear structure and tissue architecture. Collaborations include Case Western Reserve University biomedical engineering and the University of Pittsburgh Electrical Engineering departments studying to assess cancer aggressiveness in prostate cancer (PCa). Furthermore,  he is studying the application of molecular biomarkers for prostate (CaP) and bladder cancer (BlCa) detection and prognosis. Veltri’s work is funded by the National Cancer Institute’s PS-OC program grant), Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), and the Department of Defense related to research on Active Surveillance for PCa. He is also a co-investigator on a SBIR-I and II grant studying the application of microtransponders to multiplex molecular urine and serum biomarker testing for CaP.  Veltri has authored over 152 scientific publications and is either inventor or co-inventor on over twenty patents and two trademarks.

Game Theory and Cancer

What does game theory and cancer have to do with each other. I am not sure but this interesting workshop hosted by the Princeton Physical Sciences-Oncology Center and Johns Hopkins University might help you figure that out.

An announcement about the event reads:

Screen Shot 2013-08-02 at 12.03.06 PMRegistration is now open for the Workshop on Game Theory and Cancer, scheduled on August 12-13 in Baltimore, MD, and jointly hosted by our Princeton PS-OC and Johns Hopkins University. The main goal of this workshop is to provide a dialogue between leading basic researchers and clinical investigators that would help make headway against the very stubborn problem of cancer, and to jolt the oncology community into confronting the serious clinical problems that have previously been avoided.

The flyer is pretty cool, too.  Check it out here.

Additional information and preliminary agenda can be found at: http://www.princeton.edu/psoc/training/

To register, please go to: https://prism.princeton.edu/ps-oc/regform.php

For questions about the event, email maranzam@princeton.edu or sclam@princeton.edu